Limelight Flickers

Posted: September 4th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: breast cancer, mastectomy, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Andy Warhol once said, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.” The quote supposedly came about from a conversation with photographer, Nat Finkelstein, during a photo shoot. In 1966, Andy was posing for a book that Nat was working on at the time. “A crowd gathered trying to get into the pictures and Warhol supposedly remarked that everyone wants to be famous, to which Finkelstein replied, “Yeah, for about fifteen minutes, Andy.”

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol

In 1968 Warhol immortalized that satirical quip into one of his art shows at the Moderna Museet.  It was meant as a statement about how fleeting the nature of fame would become within pop-culture.

In today’s global social media culture, it seems Andy’s and Nat’s satire has been twisted, forgotten. Now people will go to great lengths to grab 15 minutes worth of fame. As if fame actually means something. Too often, too quickly, we see these people stoop to disparaging behavior in attempts to try and hang onto it.

In today’s social media culture of “adore ‘um up, chew ‘um up, spit ‘um out” I am going to satirically state the following:

 

“You can now go from fame to infamy

in 5.7 minutes flat.” ~ Chérie

 

What seems like many lifetimes ago, I was deeply immersed in the culture of professional musicians. I was married to a rather popular, and extremely talented, blues guitarist. He was well-known across the state we lived in at the time, and, in the Nordic regions of Europe. At home, there was rarely a time we could go out in public and not be approached by someone that recognized him.

When I left that limelight culture, I did so with many invaluable life-lessons … One of which was,

 

“Fame means something, and yet in the exact same nanosecond,

it means absolutely nothing.” ~ Chérie

 

A few months ago Personal P.INK asked if I would be willing to share my P.INK story of my mastectomy tattoos done in NYC in 2013 by Beloved Shannon of Indigo Rose Tattoo Studio from SC. And, be professionally photographed by Bradley E. Clift for the 2014 Fall/Winter issue in USA TODAY’s magazine, Modern Woman.

"Modern Woman"

“Modern Woman” Fall/Winter 2012

The journalist wanted to do something different during what is now the ‘breast cancer awareness month’ of October. She wanted to focus on survivors. It seems we are rarely focused upon.

Sharing my tattoo story was one thing. But posing for intimate photographs of my mastectomy tattoos, my breasts, to prospectively been seen by 2.7 million people? That gave cause for some deep consideration.

Here is why I agreed to be photographed:

If the tasteful photographs inspire just one mastectomy scarred woman, a survivor, who is just like I was — “I’m really not a tattoo kind of person. I don’t have anything against them, they’re just not me.”

If my being willing to follow in P.INK’s founder, Molly’s, “Maverick Boots” path inspires a survivor to say, “Hey, I can do that too! I can get a beautiful “forever bra” tattooed over my mastectomy scars!”

If that one survivor then follows through and reclaims her “underneath beauty” too?  As a breast cancer survivor myself, I will have just started to pay forward the treasure of tattooed ‘underneath beauty’ that was so freely gifted to me by P.INK.

The fickle nature of limelight flickers will have been worth every nerve-wracking moment. The moments of thinking this through and the photography session itself. These photographs are now forever a part of my reputation, my life, my legacy … even long after my corporeal existence is gone. That means something.

Being in the limelight can come with privileges, but it also comes with responsibilities — especially in a potentially controversial situation that these photographs may well create. Believe it not, I’ve already experienced some mean-spirited negativity from a few women in regard to my tattoos.

As to “fame,” my past experience has been that because a stranger might be familiar with your image, they can often unintentionally be too familiar in their behavior with you. They may barge into an intimate dinner. Or, passionately voice their opposing opinion(s) — anywhere at any time. There becomes a personal responsibility as to how you conduct yourself in public.

And, one must be careful to remain grounded. Don’t believe what is said about you in the mass media — good or bad. Refrain from getting caught up in the accolades. Keep yourself humble.

"Bless her heart!"

“Bless her heart!”

I didn’t participate in this project to be in the limelight … I honestly was just attempting to step up to the survivor plate and pay my survivor tattoo gift forward.

This blog article is to officially explain what went into my deciding to agree to doing the photographs for the Modern Woman magazine.

But as I stated earlier … Fame means something, yet in the exact same nanosecond, it means absolutely nothing.

So, as the limelight flickers, I pray I won’t end up a “Bless Her Heart” case. You know, one of those gals that parades around, envisioning herself to be a gracefully aging super model —  But in reality, nobody has the heart to tell her she really looks like Jay Leno … in drag.

“Bless her heart!”

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